Bisexual’s Bi-curious Facts And Figures

Woman on Woman, Men on Men

In this article, we are going to talk about the question “what is bisexuality?”.

What is a bisexual?

A bisexual is a man or woman who is sexually attracted to both sexes. There are varying degrees of bisexuality. People can find out they are bisexual at different stages in their life.

Is bisexuality common?

Bisexuality is extremely common nowadays. You will find many bisexual people around you without even knowing it. In the United States of America, 9 million Americans (3.5%) identify as lesbian, gay or as sexually promiscuous. Around 19 million Americans (8.2%) have reported that they have participated in same-sex sexual conduct and about 25.6 million Americans (11%) have some same-sex sexual fascination. There are additionally about 700,000 transgender people in the US.

Bisexual information
Image: Bisexuality

In Australia, 11 in 100 people are diverse in their sexual identity or gender identity.


LBGT statistics
Image: Australian LGBTI Facts and Figures

Is it wrong to have sexual desires for both sexes?

It is not wrong to have these desires or engage in bisexual behaviour. It is actually very normal and many people do – even people who consider themselves to be straight. It is not a crime! You have the full right to enjoy your life in any way you like as long as it is not at the expense of others! Some people suppress their sexuality due to what they have been taught through their families, friends, religion and society.

Why do people explore their bisexuality?

Many people will explore their bisexuality to find out their true sexual identity. It is better than living in the closet. Bisexuality can add an excellent spark in your sexual lifestyle. If you consider yourself as a bisexual, you can explore your bisexuality in a number of ways.

Many people are not aware of their bisexuality

Sexual thoughts can be confusing especially if you don’t have a lot of sexual experience. Many people have secret desires to experiment and experience intimacy with people of the same sex. Some people view themselves as a straight person who can get turned on by the same-sex. Some straight people even watch gay porn, bisexual porn and lesbian porn. Many people fantasize about having a threesome and some actually do it. Threesomes are considered to be a bisexual fantasy even if both the lovers you are with are of the opposite sex.

It is not like homosexuality, where you slowly discover that you’re attracted to the same sex but it can be even more confusing. Bisexuals do not get a clear cut definition of who they like and don’t like, rather they experience a blurred landscape whereby they discover that they have feelings for both sexes and they struggle to identify with this. Some people do not know whether they are bisexual or not.

Is there a test to identify a person’s sexuality?

The Kinsey Scale rates people from 0 to 6. A rating of 0 means that a person is exclusively heterosexual and a rating of 6 means that a person is exclusively homosexual. People are also able to rate in-between these numbers. The Kinsey Scale determined that sexuality is not only situational but there is no standard sexuality. The Kinsey Scale is also known as the Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale.

Some bisexuals conceal their sexual identity

Most bisexual people do not want to bring attention to their sexual identity. In fact, they tend to conceal their sexual identity and make friends in general social circles. This often presents enormous pressure when a bi person gets to know a person more intimately as they then have a dilemma as to whether to tell their new friend their sexual identity. If two bi people live together with each other then they can better understand each other and they also can support each other whether they are in a relationship together or not. But bisexuals often try to hide their true selves, they often fail to find the perfect partner for them as a bisexual person.  It is really difficult to find the perfect bisexual partner when often they do not know whether a person is bisexual or not. Normally people say that to find the perfect partner is very difficult but finding a bisexual partner is even harder than that.

It is important to keep in mind that there can be many issues when someone comes out with their sexuality which is one of the reasons some people do not talk about their sexual preferences. One of the other reasons is that most of the time a person’s sexual identity does not come up in day to day conversation. Although times have changed with the raising of awareness of different sexual identities and the legalisation of same-sex marriage almost all around the world!

Bisexual Pink Purple Blue Flag
Image: Bisexual Flag

How to meetup and date other bisexuals?

A quick and very useful way to find and make bisexual friends and lovers is to use adult dating websites and applications. Once you meet up, you both have the opportunity remain friends, become lovers or move on and find someone completely different. When trying to find a dating match you should be patient and meet up when the timing is right. Love who you are and your sexuality, share your love with the person who you choose is your best match. If they see you trying, they may try just as much as you do.

Bisexuals and long term relationships

Some people are afraid that if they had a relationship with a bisexual that there would be relationship problems. People are often scared that a bisexual may leave them for a person of the same or opposite sex as there is more people that they can choose to date. Some people are scared that may never be able to fully satisfy a bisexual. Some people also struggle to understand that someone can be attracted to multiple types of people. There are many myths about bisexuals.

The truth is, many people get through life, believing that the person that they have married is the love of their life, but they inevitably realise that there is something missing within their lives. Some people act on this, either in the form of threesomes or with an extramarital affair, and others will simply ignore this and move on.

Many bisexuals can have a monogamous relationship with just one long term partner even though they have an inclination to be with a person of the opposite sex to their partner. If you are married or in a committed relationship and you are planning on exploring your sexuality, it is recommended that you honestly communicate with your partner your sexual needs.

If you intend to build a serious relationship with a bisexual person then you will need to accept the idea that your partner may find people of both sexes attractive. Remember, a leopard cannot change it’s spots no more than a bisexual can change their sexual desires. Take your relationship slowly, be as open and honest when you’re dating. If you create a foundation of honesty and trust, you can build a healthy relationship.

Bisexuals and sex toys

There is now a large range of sex toys for bisexuals including strapless strap-ons, strap-on dildos and harnesses.

Are there any bisexual celebrities?

There are a lot of celebrities and YouTube stars who are bisexual including Drew Barrymore, Angelina Jolie, Amy Winehouse, Lindsay Lohan, Shane Dawson, Lady Gaga and Marlon Brandon just to name a few who come to mind! Below I have included a video of the YouTube star “Shane Dawson” who has over 16.4 million subscribers on his YouTube channel.

Why do people love bisexuals?

Many people love bisexual people as they are conscious of their sexuality and needs within a relationship.

Richard runs the marketing and social profiles of adultsmart and adultsmart blog. He has been in the industry just over 10 years and enjoys his role both in an administrative capacity as well keeping abreast of issues relating to sexual health and lifestyles.

Bi & Married Dilemma Of A Woman At Mardis Gras!

Mardi Gras

Happy Mardi Gras everyone! I love this time of year, everyone is gearing up in their rainbow kit and is ready to take to the streets loud and proud like it should be. Mardi Gras is one of the many things that makes me so proud to be Australian. I am so thankful for the work of the 78’ers and the groups and activists that came before and after them, because of these people our LGBTQIA+ sisters, brothers and non-binary family enjoy a level of equality that seemed unattainable 20 years ago (that isn’t to say the work is done *cough* Trans rights *cough*). We are celebrating the achievements of this marginalised community, showing up in support of them and finally at long last celebrating that we now have marriage equality!

LGBTQIA+ marriage equality passed
Image: Marriage Equality

Is this for me? A married bi girl’s interesting relationship with Mardi Gras!

However for a bi girl who is in a relationship with a man (whom I also married) Mardi Gras can be a conflicting time for me. While I love Mardi Gras soooo much (seriously we need to start decorating our houses for Mardi Gras the way we do for Christmas) it is hard to see it as a celebration that I can be completely involved in. I feel this way because I have been told repeatedly to my face that I am, “not really queer” and while that pisses me right off, I also totally get where that perception comes from. As a white, straight seeming woman, I have not experienced the same level of discrimination and hard ship that some members of my LGBTQIA+ family have. I have never received an odd look or worse for holding my husband’s hand down the street; no one has ever threatened violence towards me because of my outwardly perceived sexuality or any of the other awful bullshit that is thrown unfairly towards the community.  I have had a charmed queer experience by comparison, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t had a queer experience. My queer experience may have been quieter than some others but it was profound and extremely important to me and the person I am still becoming.

So here is my problem, I am queer; I know this in my heart and my pants. But I also see people’s points to the contrary as well, I haven’t experienced the hardships that other members of the LGBTQIA+ community has; and because of this I understand how this may to some jade my “queer status.”

But this year, with Mardi Gras around the corner it got me thinking does a queer person have to go through a degree of torment to be considered properly queer or are we now getting to a point in our society (White Anglo-Saxon society, I acknowledge that this isn’t the case for many people both in and outside of Australia) where a queer person doesn’t have to have battle scars to be accepted. Isn’t that what the 78’ers were marching for in the first place?  Wide spread societal acceptance? I think so. I love hearing about young people now who didn’t have to “come out” to their parents, they just brought home the person they liked and were accepted for it, I love hearing about how queerness is now becoming part of normalness.

That doesn’t mean for a damn second I want us to lose our identity as a community, I want us to expand the idea of what the queer experience is. So that means for out, loud and wonderful queens, acceptance.  The button down corporate girl who isn’t all about her sexuality, acceptance. A non-binary person just existing, acceptance.

This is in no way a critique of the LGBTQIA+ community (in fact, the only people to tell me I wasn’t queer were straight people) it is rather a catch cry for wider society to expand its idea and definition of queerness so queer people can be whoever the hell they want. At last.

Happy Mardi Gras 😊  If you are looking for help or support, check out the LGBTQIA+ services available in your local community.

Author: Jamie is a consultant from Oh Zone Adult Lifestyle Centres

Jennifer works marketing at Adultsmart an online sex toy shop. She has a non-judgemental approach to sex, sex toys and sexuality. Her favorite saying is if it feels good and right and is not illegal then why not!

Staying Clear – Safe Sex Isn’t Quick Sex

Gay sex

You see him at the club. He sees you. You smile. He smiles. And then he comes on over to you. You dance. You drink. Your hands are all over each other – feeling, devouring each other’s bodies. Staring into each other’s eyes. Lips. Kissing. Tongues flickering. You can both feel the lust rising between you – the heat between your legs as you want him. And he wants you. He reaches towards your pants and feels you – you know what he wants as he smirks and you lean in closer, your lips brushing against his ears as your alcohol filled breath makes the hands on his neck stand up and he leans forward hungrily. You open your mouth, closer . . .

“I’ve had my sexual health test recently. What about you?”

It’s a question that we don’t ask often enough and it’s more prevalent than ever. The introduction of PrEP has arguably lulled the gay community into a false sense of security and it’s certainly something that we need to shore up. PrEP is an acronym that stands for pre-exposure prophylaxis. It’s an antiretroviral drug that an individual would take daily to protect from, and prevent HIV infection. However, whilst Individuals on PrEP might be protected from the dangers of HIV, it certainly doesn’t make them immune to other sexually transmitted illnesses such as gonorrhoea, chlamydia, herpes and genital warts, and a range of other easily transmitted illnesses.

PrEP pill
Image: PrEP

One would easily be mistaken in the idea that the older generations would see less sexually transmitted diseases – however, statistics have indicated a worrying trend indicating sexually transmitted illnesses in the 50-70 category has risen by more than a third in the past decade. So what do the gay community and the older sexually active community have in common?

Many people in this category are under the false belief that they don’t need to use condoms anymore and it’s a recent concern that’s coming up within the queer community with the approval of PrEP on the PBS scheme. There is a concern among some parts of the medical community that argue that PrEP should not be replacing condoms. Yes, it dramatically minimises the risk of HIV, but all the other STI’s shouldn’t be forgotten either.

A French study in 2016 that went alongside the PrEP study found that individuals who knew they were on PrEP (not a placebo) had a significant decrease of condom use by up to 20% of the levels of condom use they had before being on PrEP.  A South African academic study published in 2017 on female sex workers indicated reductions in condom use on people using PrEP. The article noted that efforts to promote condom use among female sex workers on PrEP would be critical in raising the effectiveness of a decrease in STI and HIV transmissions. Closer to home, an Australian study in 2017 noted a 23% decrease in HIV infection rates during the PrEP trial, but a marked increase in STI’s. Gonorrhoea is particularly troubling as drug-resistant strains are starting to pop up around the world – though it has not yet been reported within Australian shores. This research indicates that it is critical to check your sexual partner’s health before engaging in sex.

It’s often considered a boner-killing conversation, but sexual health should come before all sexual desires and whilst it has this loathsome reputation of being a heat killer – it doesn’t have to be. I write this with the knowledge of a true story around a young questioning male who decided to engage in sexual relations with an older man. This was his first male-to-male sexual encounter and he heartbreakingly contracted HIV as a result. This young male – exploring his sexuality – had now contracted an illness that was going to be with him for the rest of his life as a result of having unprotected sex. I’m not here to argue the morality of this case or advocate for mandatory safe sex, and whilst I acknowledge that this isn’t a common situation – it demonstrates how the decisions of multiple people have led to such an event and it highlights the importance of checking in with your sexual partner. One could argue that neither of them knew, one could also argue that they should have worn protection – but as you’d know reading this, in the heat of the moment these questions come second to the driving factor of sexual arousal and desire.

Safe sex isn’t quick sex. It’s not about lust, it’s not about the heat of the moment.  You shouldn’t be asking the question in the club whilst you’re dancing, and you certainly shouldn’t be asking in the toilet when you’re on your knees with his dick in your mouth – so when is a good time?

Ideally, you shouldn’t have the conversation when you’re aroused. Though I recognise the difficulty for some people in this especially when it comes to situational sex that arises through partying, clubbing and other events. It can simply be a quick statement and question of ‘I’ve had my last sexual health check recently – when was yours?’ If they can’t remember, or won’t disclose, then you might want to reconsider your chosen playmate for the night and it might just be time to head home. In such situational sex circumstances, it would be best to ALWAYS wear a condom.

In an ideal situation, you’d want to be having the conversation once you realise that there’s an attraction. Where you can both sit down without interruptions and ask a similarly phrased question. You need to remember that talking about one’s sexual health involves the disclosure of their last sexual health check, whether they’ve had an STI and whether they’ve been treated for it – it doesn’t involve sexual partner history or any form of judgement on previous choices made. There’s no right A-B-C to having the conversation – but keeping it free from accusations and judgement will certainly make it go a lot easier – remembering that it’s about ensuring each other’s safety, and not a personal inquisition. If you have concerns, politely and gently, bring them up or suggest that you go and get checked together. I assure you, knowing that you’re both sexually clear will allow you to have stress-free check and will eliminate the need to awkwardly visit the doctor later on for questions or an urgent check for that night where you just didn’t put it on.

Author: Stephen Smith – BA Of Social Sciences, M.Ed

Stephen is a cis-gendered gay male who spends far too much time with his two cats and eating tim tams. A self-identified sex-positive advocate he cares deeply about gender equality, disabilities, sexual education and social issues. Opinionated and bold he isn’t afraid to speak his mind and say what others won’t. With a yearning for knowledge and experience in all things relating to sex, he is a prolific writer that has developed the content for a myriad of informative Sexual Health and Wellness websites.

Stephen’s articles and writings tends to focus on social issues, sexual education, queer issues and all things fetish and absurd. He comes qualified with the completion of a double Bachelor degree in Social Sciences and literature, and a Masters in Education.

Top Secret World Of Crossdressing Husbands

Men Love Dressing as Women

Many people do not know exactly what a transvestite actually is. This article will look into answering some of the questions you may have about transvestites and the top secret world of crossdressing husbands.

What Is A Transvestite?

A transvestite is a man who feels and is interested in wearing women’s clothing. Transvestites feel more comfortable wearing women’s clothing than wearing men’s clothing. Another term for transvestite is crossdresser. There are transvestites from all kinds of backgrounds.

What Pronouns Should I Use For A Transvestite?

In this modern world, most transvestites who like to dress like women do not want to introduce themselves as a transvestite.  The term transvestite may not be the preferred label that a person would like to be called. Some people may feel that the term transvestite is very offensive and would prefer to be called a crossdresser.

How Do Men Wear Women’s Clothing?

Crossdressers may be more comfortable and feel happier when they crossdress. Some men enjoy the feeling of women’s clothing as it can feel delicate and soft. Men can wear women’s lingerie under their clothing. This is a way to crossdress without openly showing other people publicly. In some cases, their spouses are unaware that their husband, boyfriend or lover is crossdressing.

People can crossdress privately in their own homes or in a public setting. They may choose to wear dresses, lingerie, and costumes. They may also wish to use jewellery, make-up, bras with breast fillers, wigs and get their eyebrows done.

Some crossdressers look like men dressed as women which may not be their ultimate aim. This may happen if they apply make-up incorrectly or wear clothing that doesn’t compliment their body type.  Learning the art of dressing as a woman might make their life much easier and often with practice and perseverance they can succeed.

If you are crossdresser keep it simple to start off with. Avoid high heels, especially those which have sling-backs as you will look clumsy and awkward.  Stay clear of glittery cocktail dresses unless you have practiced going out, standing and sitting just like a woman.  Most importantly, use make up sparingly at first. Make sure the make-up does not have glitter or harsh colours.  After you are comfortable with practice and experience you can then start to experiment.

Sexy crossdresser
Image: Crossdressing Man

Are Crossdressers Aroused By Wearing The Opposite Sexes Clothes?

Wearing the opposite sexes clothes may have nothing to do with being aroused. Like everyone else, they may not even be interested in having sex while wearing clothes.

How Do Crossdressers Act?

Crossdressers often desire not just to dress like the opposite sex, sometimes they also feel that they should behave with a more feminine nature than a masculine nature.

What About Crossdressers And Sex?

Sometimes, the crossdresser’s partner may not be aware of who they are at the beginning of the relationship. If a crossdresser later comes out to his partner they can sometimes become sexually confused. They can feel uneasy, upset and intolerant with gender play. Women who are in a relationship with a crossdresser may feel that they are not with a real man even though they are. For these reasons, women often just don’t feel interested in being intimate with their partner when they are crossdressing which is perfectly acceptable. Though this will cause their relationship to suffer. However, there are ways to deal with it and make sense of it.

It is seen that often many crossdressing men dress identical to their partner, or someone else that they idolise as this is the person that they love however this may even put more pressure on their relationship.  It can be a tough thing to deal with when your partner keeps stealing your clothes.

For this reason crossdressers must compromise. In order to compromise they must be aware of what their partner is comfortable with. Some partners may choose to leave the house or be in a different room when their husband, boyfriend or lover crossdresses. It is highly recommended to seek professional help for couples counselling.

Are Crossdressers Women Trapped In A Man’s Body?

Most crossdressers never feel that they are trapped in the wrong body. Most enjoy being a man and they never feel that they should be a woman. Instead, they are a man in woman’s clothing. They don’t require assistance with hormonal therapy or surgery to make them look more female.

What Is Trans?

Transgender or trans is an umbrella term for individuals whose sexual orientation character or expression is unique in relation to those regularly connected with the sex that they were born with. Being trans is about a person’s gender whereas being hetero, bi or gay is about their sexuality. Gender and sex are two distinct things.

What Is The Difference Between A Crossdresser And A Transsexual?

Many people are confused about the differences between a crossdresser and a transsexual. People who wish to change their gender are called transsexuals. Most of the time people who do not feel comfortable being a man, may feel that their psychology does not match up with their body. In the event that they feel unhappy, distressed and anxious it can cause the man to find a way to change his gender through gender modification surgery and hormonal therapy. A man who feels this way is said to have gender dysphoria. Women can also experience gender dysphoria.

Transvestite Man
Image: Famous Crossdresser

Why Do People Become Crossdressers?

There is no real known psychological reason to be a crossdresser or why people would like to be one. Nobody actually knows why some men prefer to wear women’s clothing. Most men who crossdress summarise it as a possible outlet for stress and anxiety that they had experienced in their lives. They had said that they tend to crossdress more through times where there is tension at work or in the home. When men crossdress they may feel the need to express themselves through their clothing which in turn makes them happier.

Do Crossdressers Want To Change?

It has recently been discovered that almost all crossdressers out there have never even considered having any psychological or medical treatment because these people find that their lives are just fine the way they are. A lot of crossdressers are happy and do not wish to change. However, some men may feel bombarded with guilt because they have hidden their desire to crossdress for so long they may require counselling.

Being a crossdresser is not a disease or a mental illness and a surprisingly large number of people crossdress to some extent. Many people do not share it with others. Those that have not accepted that this is part of their persona may feel better by talking about the situation to someone who is non-judgmental and understanding.

Why Is It Important For Crossdressers To Meet Likeminded People?

There are LGBTQIA+ communities who have social networks where people can meet likeminded people for support. Many support groups will not only offer advice on how to accept being a crossdresser but may help in selecting the most appropriate clothing to wear and make-up to use.

How Does Society View Crossdressers?

In the 70s there was a sexual revolution which supported the experimentation with gender and sexuality. Now there are entire communities and organisations raising awareness of different genders and sexualities which has made a great increase in acceptance and understanding within the community.

I hope this article answers some of the questions you may have had about crossdressers.

Richard runs the marketing and social profiles of adultsmart and adultsmart blog. He has been in the industry just over 10 years and enjoys his role both in an administrative capacity as well keeping abreast of issues relating to sexual health and lifestyles.

Coming Out Of The Closet As A Gay Teen


Coming out! It is a scary time for every person of the LGBTQIA+ community and every one of us has to go through it, and we usually don’t come out once but multiple times. We come out to our friends, parents, family, peers and colleagues. As we get older it becomes easier, and generally not even needed. Now I feel that I don’t have to come out to people and that if they have a problem, it’s theirs and not mine.

But it wasn’t always like that. And I, just like everyone had a tough time coming to terms with my sexuality. It was when I was about 14 when I started to notice guys. I was in denial for so long. I was okay with gay people. I always knew that my uncles were gay and I was completely fine. It was just something I wasn’t. Or so I thought at the time. When I was 15 and in year 10, there was a boy in the year above me. A senior who I would always stare at and admire how beautiful he was. But no! I wasn’t gay! That just wasn’t me. I remember thinking how being gay was for other people, but not me. But after months of being in denial, one day I completed my usually routine and finished art class, I walked from H block and stared at the guy, but I finally admitted to myself. “Brett! Admit it! You’re gay! You’re a big fat flamer and you like penis!” I felt as though a massive weight had been lifted!

How I Came Out Of The Closet

Now that I had admitted it to myself, I needed to talk about it. Back when I was in high school, there weren’t a whole lot of options as to where you could meet other gay teenagers. But one place that was popular to chat was on the website of a local radio station, so I hopped on there and started chatting. It was an open chat so I was anonymous. “Any gay guys?” I typed and waited. Someone responded and we went to a private chat. He seemed nice and we had things that we had in common, so we decided to exchange numbers. He said he would call me, so I disconnected from the computer and ran to my room to await his call. I was so scared, nervous and excited. I had butterflies and it felt like it had been hours, but in fact it was only a few moments. He rang and we talked into the early hours of the morning. We talked over the phone for about 2 weeks until he suggested we meet. I agreed but was so scared. We arranged to meet in a public space. (I wasn’t stupid. This was the early days of the internet, but I still knew not to meet a total stranger somewhere private) We met and wow! I had never done anything like that before. It was one of the most exciting but scary things I had ever done. I was so nervous that I took a backpack with every CD I owned. It weighed a tonne! But, after that initial meet, we had gotten to know each other more and we became good friends.

The next person I came out to was an actual family member. I went to lunch with her and I said I wanted to buy some designer clothing and black nail polish (I was going through a wannabe Goth stage. How tragic). She asked why and said people might think I was gay. I said maybe I was. My gosh, I just did it. It felt like an eternity for her to answer, and she replied with love and kindness.

Rainbow sexuality label
Image: I Am Gay!

I slowly came out to friends after that and was met with support and kindness. But the big one was my parents! I remember it so clearly. I was in my room one morning and my mum came in to just have a chat. We ended up on the subject of my internet friend, (as far as she knew, he was a friend of a friend) and she said she thought he might have a crush on my uncle. I said probably, and then she asked if I had a crush on my friend. I said I did and she started to cry. Not exactly the reaction I had hoped for. She said she was just hoping I would marry a nice girl who would give her grandchildren and they could go shopping and my brother would marry some skank that just wanted sex and money. Her words, not mine. After the initial shock things were fine I thought, and it took her many years to come to terms with it. I’m honestly not sure if she is 100%. As for my father, well we’ve never had the talk, and never will. It’s just an unspoken thing that has just been accepted. He and my mother have had discussions about it, she’s told me. He loves me and just wants me to be happy, and that’s all that matters. We don’t need to have a big coming out moment. I was met by full support from my brother. That felt good.

I have been very lucky with my coming out story. I have had very little negativity, and what little I have, have been from unimportant people. I’ve had friends who have had horrendous coming outs. They’ve been bashed, kicked out of home and abandoned by their family. So I am definitely very lucky that I have had such an easy coming out. But, it is still mine and I have had my own difficulties, the main one being the response from my mother. In every other way we are close, it hurts but we are getting better.

Coming out is hard for every single person and not an easy thing to do but we just have to support each other. If we don’t get that from our families, we make our own, whether it be from blood, or friends. But either way, we need to surround ourselves with love, support and positivity. It does get better!

Author: Brett is a consultant from Oh Zone Adult Lifestyle Centres

Stephen is a cis-gendered gay male who spends far too much time with his two cats and eating tim tams. A self-identified sex-positive advocate he cares deeply about gender equality, disabilities, sexual education and social issues. Opinionated and bold he isn’t afraid to speak his mind and say what others won’t. With a yearning for knowledge and experience in all things relating to sex, he is a prolific writer that has developed the content for a myriad of informative Sexual Health and Wellness websites.

Stephen’s articles and writings tends to focus on social issues, sexual education, queer issues and all things fetish and absurd. He comes qualified with the completion of a double Bachelor degree in Social Sciences and literature, and a Masters in Education.