A Fun Cup For Your Fun Factory

Exactly two years ago to the month (insert X-Files theme song), Adultsmart published an article on vaginal odours and menstrual cups. The article I wrote began with this bold statement:

 “If you have a vagina, or you know someone who has a vagina, you/your friend with a vagina, NEEDS a menstrual cup. Or, let me start with a less bold statement – you/your friend with a vagina needs to consider not using tampons”.

It’s been two years and by God I stand by my proclamation.

When I first got my period, I jumped straight to using tampons for convenience. My mum used them and she said that they were easy, comfortable, you could swim with them in and basically everybody uses them. For years I suffered from extreme discomfort during menstruation with severe vaginal itchiness, dryness and hotness. As I got older, things got worse and it became impossible for me to self-lubricate during sex. My vagina was a hot mess, literally, and it took me years to piece together that tampons were the problem.

When you Google “side effects of using tampons” a number of alarming words and sentiments are scattered through the results page, such as; severe irritation, made with harsh chemicals, increases risk in serious diseases, linked to cancer, can cause vaginal infections and so on. It makes me question, why are tampons so highly recommended over other menstrual products with ZERO side effects, which have better consequences for the environment?

What if I told you that you could buy just ONE product to use while on your period, that you would not have to replace for years to come.

Cue, the menstrual cup.

Menstrual cups have been around for 80 odd years, but the truth of their excellence has been lost in the current throw-away society, which has consumers purchasing one use items that are designed to be used once and then tossed away. Menstrual cups are a small, typically flexible silicone cup, that fits up inside the vagina to catch menstrual blood and are designed to be reused for many years.

Benefits of using menstrual cups

  • ZERO discomfort or vaginal irritation during use (if made from high quality medical grade silicone)
  • Can be worn safely for up to 12 hours
  • They cost less than tampons in the long run: one cup can cost you anywhere between $30-$60 (depending on the brand) and can last you up to ten years. The cost of tampons could be broken down to (based on my menstrual… abilities?) = 1 tampon every 4-5 hours x 4 tampons per day x around 7 days of a menstrual period, equals around 28 tampons per cycle. Times 28 tampons by the average amount of menstrual periods in a lifetime (456 periods), that equals 12,768 tampons. At around 32 tampons per box, that’s 399 boxes of tampons. Times that by the average fee of a box of tampons, which is around AUD$8.00, that’s $3,192 in just one person’s life time. JUST ON TAMPONS.
  • They don’t end up in landfill or in our oceans
  • Little to no odour as the menstrual blood is not exposed to oxygen due to the suction of the menstrual cup on the vaginal walls
  • Sexual intercourse is possible, and less messy
  • Great for people who define themselves as non-binary
  • Perfect for travel
  • Easy to use

There’re many menstrual cup companies which are available to use around the world. I started with Australian made and owned ‘JuJu Cup’, which was great, until I tried the Fun Factory Fun Cup. It’s no secret that I love Fun Factory. I have written many a review on Fun Factory’s expertise and capabilities in sex toy manufacturing, but I was genuinely impressed to see them take on the task of creating a cutting-edge menstrual cup. And they’ve done it.

Watch this short promotional video to see the cups in use! Not literally, get your head outta’ the gutter!

The Fun Cup comes in two sizes. Genius. Not every vagina is the same size or bleeds the same amount of blood, duh. So Fun Factory have created the ‘A’ cup and the ‘B’ cup.

Fun Factory Fun Cup
Image: Fun Factory Fun Cup Sizes

The A cup is smaller in size and holds 20ml of blood while the B cup is larger and can hold up to 30ml of blood. Fun Factory recommends the A cup for people with a lighter flow, or for people who haven’t given birth, while the B cup would suit a heavier flow and for people who have given birth. I know what you’re thinking… What if I buy the A cup but it’s not suited to my flow or is the wrong size ergonomically for my body? Well that’s the genius thing. Fun Factory has created three options: The A + A kit, where you get two A cups, the B + B kit, two B cups, and the Explore kit, where you can get one of each cup size. GENIUS.

I happily use the A cup as my cup of choice during menstruation. I was hoping to be able to use the B cup, as I do have a heavier flow, though the size wasn’t quite right for my body (okay Fun Factory, you were right). But that’s the great thing about the size kit – you know 100% when buying it that one of those cups will fit your body and work best for your period. For me, on a bad first day, I can wear the A cup for around 4 hours before needing to empty it. But from usually the second day onwards, I can go all day or all night before needing to change my cup. I wake up in the morning, empty the cup, rinse, put it back in and can leave it until I go to bed. Care free. ALL DAY.

Fun Factory’s Fun Cups are made with the same non-porous, hypoallergenic, medical-grade silicone that Fun Factory uses for their sex toys. You can totally tell when you hold the cups in your hands that they’re made from top quality materials. They’re flexible, but sturdy enough to bend and pop back into shape in your vagina.

To insert, you bend the cup into different shapes to easily insert it into your vagina, though the three most popular folds are shown in the below image. The more you play around with your Fun Cup, the quicker you’ll realise what method is easiest for you to quickly and seamlessly insert your cup. I personally prefer the C-fold.

Fun Factory Fun Cup diagram
Buy Now | Fun Factory’s sexual wellness products

Once you’ve inserted your cup as far as you can comfortably insert it, for it to be correctly inserted you should be able to feel when you run your fingers around the base of the cup that the cup is popped out all the way and suctioned completely to the walls of your vagina. If there are some folds or the cup hasn’t quite popped out right, you can fix it by using the sturdy base of the cup to twist and shuffle the cup around to encourage it to pop out.

What’s great about the Fun Cup is that the bottom of the cup is made from hard, firm silicone which is easy to hold onto inside your vagina to twist the cup into place or to use it to remove the cup. My JuJu cup had a long string-like piece of silicone, similar to the image above but thinner, which when you pulled would stretch out like an elastic band. Once, in the early days when I was trying to remove my cup, I pulled the silicone string and it stretched out and then flicked back up into my vagina like a cruel, unforgiving slingshot. Thankfully, the Fun Cup’s solid base does not stretch out and is a great base to hold onto to remove the cup. It also stops before turning into the flexible cup so there is no accidental grabbing of the cup leading to over-spilling when trying to remove it.

Tips and tricks to securing your Fun Cup

  • Lubricate the circular rim of the cup and it will slide straight in and pop into shape perfect, first go
  • Pinch from the bottom of the cup when inserting the cup so that you can propel it into your vagina and allow it to pop into shape without your fingers being in the way
  • Twist and shuffle into place, rather than removing the cup and re-inserting
  • According to Fun Factory, the fun cup A holds FOUR TIMES the amount of blood a tampon does, allowing for the coolest thing (in my opinion), which is being able to easily measure how much you bleed in an average cycle and what the average consistency and colour of your menstrual blood is; which is actually pretty useful information if you ever need to see a doctor about suspected menstrual abnormalities.

Once you want to empty your menstrual cup, you squeeze and pull from that little anchor point at the bottom and pull the cup out. You can pour the blood into the toilet bowl, or ceremoniously dump it if that’s more your style, and then flush it away. All you need to do to keep your cup clean while on your period, rinse with water or wipe with toilet paper before re-inserting.

Once your period has finished, it’s highly recommended that you boil your cup in water to correctly clean it. In the Fun Factory video, it shows you somebody doing this over the stove in a pot… I’m super lazy, or super-efficient depending how you look at it, and have a dedicated ‘period cup’ which I pour boiling water into from the kettle and let the cup sit in that for around 2-3 minutes before storing it in the antimicrobial bag that comes with the Fun Cup’s. The antimicrobial bag means that you can keep the cup on you at all times in a safe and clean bag, ensuring the cup is ready to be used whenever you need it.

One of my FAVOURITE features of the Fun Cup is that it’s opaque (non-transparent). My JuJu cup is made from a see-through silicone, which after two years is looking a bit… grotesque. The colour is now a sort of dull-yellow, whilst cleaned correctly after every period, the stains still remain. My Fun Cup appears to have never been used, even when I pull it straight out of my vagina. The blood seems to not adhere to the silicone, somehow, like those sprays you use to keep your new shoes clean, when rinsed the blood comes straight off.

On top of being better for your body and better for the environment, Fun Factory also markets the Fun Cup as being a great product for anybody who menstruates, not just cis-gendered women. The Fun Cup’s packaging is non-gendered, and the colours of the cups are also androgynous. But not only that, the Fun Cup allows menstruators to live with their period in an easi-ER fashion.

Making the switch from tampons to a menstrual cup like the Fun Cup, could save 12,768 of your tampons from going into the ocean or into land fill. When you think about how many people globally are menstruating, that’s a lot of tampons, and your small switch to a Fun Cup, can make a big difference to the environment. Overall, I was super happy with the design and ergonomics of the Fun Cup and had no troubles in using the A cup. Whilst I did try to conquer the B cup, the B cup conquered me, granted, it is recommended for use in people who have had children. The Fun Cup is easy to insert, easy to remove and easy to clean and I can say that I have more than happily made the switch from my beloved first menstrual cup. The only downside of a Fun Cup, is that it makes you one of those annoying friends who constantly tries to force their friends and family into purchasing one also.

Author: Chloe is a consultant from Oh Zone Adult Lifestyle Centres

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Jennifer works marketing at Adultsmart an online sex toy shop. She has a non-judgemental approach to sex, sex toys and sexuality. Her favorite saying is if it feels good and right and is not illegal then why not!

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